Why the medical AI company Dascena hopes hard evidence will separate it from its rivals- STAT – STAT

Exclusive analysis of biotech, pharma, and the life sciences
Account
More
Follow Us
In-depth analysis of biotech, pharma, and the life sciences
from some of the nation's most trusted and well-connected reporters in the industry
with STAT+ reporters and leading industry experts in our STAT+ Conversations series
hosted by STAT+, plus early-bird access and discounts to industry events around the country
get delivered to your inbox to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
like our CRISPR Trackr and Drug Pricing Policy Tracker
In-depth analysis of biotech, pharma, and the life sciences
from some of the nation's most trusted and well-connected reporters in the industry
with STAT+ reporters and leading industry experts in our STAT+ Conversations series
hosted by STAT+, plus early-bird access and discounts to industry events around the country
get delivered to your inbox to brief you on the most important industry news of the day
like our CRISPR Trackr and Drug Pricing Policy Tracker
By Casey Ross Oct. 1, 2021
Think of it as digital health’s chicken and egg problem. Which comes first: national distribution of your algorithm, or clinical evidence that it works? For a startup, it is almost impossible to have one without the other.
The medical artificial intelligence company Dascena is among many early-stage companies in the throes of this debate. It has developed multiple promising algorithms to give clinicians early warning of conditions such as acute kidney injury and sepsis, a life-threatening complication of infection. But how does it turn promise into hard proof, and ultimately, profit?
Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free!
STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.
National Technology Correspondent
Casey covers the use of artificial intelligence in medicine and its underlying questions of safety, fairness, and privacy. He is the co-author of the newsletter STAT Health Tech.




This name will appear with your comment
There was an error saving your display name. Please check and try again.
By Isabella Cueto
By Erin Brodwin
advertisement
By Ed Silverman
By Rachel Cohrs and Nicholas Florko
By Casey Ross
Reporting from the frontiers of health and medicine

source
Connect with Chris Hood, a digital strategist that can help you with AI.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© 2021 AI Caosuo - Proudly powered by theme Octo